Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum: New Leaders

In September 2019, the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum formally opened the doorways to

In September 2019, the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum formally opened the doorways to its manufacturer new, fifty five,000-sq.-foot spot in Dallas’ West Conclude Historic District. It showcased a futuristic Dimensions in Testimony℠ Theater, a point out-of-the-art 250-seat Cinemark Theater, 4 lasting exhibition wings, and digitized testimonies of Holocaust Survivors.

Today, the Museum announced the appointment of ten newly-elected associates to the Museum’s Board of Administrators for 2020. Each individual appointee is a precious member of the neighborhood and provides remarkably-regarded and various skilled skills to the Museum’s management group.       

“We
are particularly very pleased and enthusiastic to welcome these 10 spectacular men and women to
our board,” explained Mary Pat Higgins, President and CEO of the Museum.
“Each board member was selected because of to their comprehensive determination to the
Museum’s mission of instructing the historical past of the Holocaust, advancing human
rights and inspiring Upstander conduct.”

The Museum,
which has been acknowledged by publications and friends from throughout the nation,
aims to attract hundreds of 1000’s of readers in the following 12 months. Because its
opening, it has by now doubled stroll-in visits and student team attendance.

“These
gentlemen and gals be a part of our board of directors at a critical time in our Museum’s
and nation’s historical past,” explained Frank Risch, Museum Board Chair. “We are
assured that their assist, skills and experience will offer priceless
views as we continue to get the job done in the direction of our goals and strive to advertise
training and equality.”

The mission of the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum is to teach the historical past of the Holocaust and progress human rights to battle prejudice, hatred, and indifference. To begin with conceived in 1977 by local Holocaust survivors, the institution now resides in a manufacturer-new facility in Dallas’ Historic West Conclude where by readers experience a deeper immersion into human and civil rights, their centrality to our democracy, and their critical importance in stopping occasions like those of the Holocaust from going on once again. The fifty five,000-sq.-foot lasting home addresses three floors, and the primary exhibition includes 4 wings: Orientation Wing, Holocaust/Shoah Wing, Human Rights Wing, and Pivot to The us Wing.